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4.3 Glossary

Accessibility Standards

Accessibility Standards

There are rules and guidelines that governments, organizations, or industry groups created to make sure that things like products, services, and places are easy for deaf people to use. These standards help make sure that there’s consistency and responsibility in making things accessible for deaf individuals.

AIDE

AIDE

Stands as Accessibility, Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity, with the focus on Accessibility as the essential part of Deaf people in any aspect of their lives in the community. An appropriate modification from the term DEI that is mainly used in the world.

Ally

Ally

Describes a person who actively supports people of marginal communities, such as First Nations, LGBTQI+, and Deaf, with the aim of promoting the goals and changes that those groups set out.

Assistive Technology

Assistive Technology

This means the devices or tools specifically designed to help deaf people with tasks like communication, accessing information, or participating in activities. Examples include devices that show captions, apps that translate spoken words into text, and hearing aids.

Auslan

Auslan

The natural sign language used in Australia is Auslan, which operates within a visual-spatial modality and is employed by over 30,000 members of the Deaf community. Developed from a combination of British Sign Language (BSL), Irish Sign Language (ISL), and other influences since the 1820s, Auslan was officially recognized as a community language by the Australian government in 1991. It possesses its own distinct grammar and structure, differing from both English and other spoken languages.

Culturally and Linguistic Diverse (CALD)

Culturally and Linguistic Diverse (CALD)

This refers to a group of people who come from various cultural backgrounds and speak different languages. These individuals may have different customs, traditions, and ways of communicating due to their diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

Culturally Inclusive / Responsible / Competence

Culturally Inclusive / Responsible / Competence

While a Deaf person would identify as Deaf first, there could be more that overlaps in their intersectionality, such as ethnicity, language, location, religion, race, and more. Having a place that is totally culturally inclusive means a Deaf person can thrive in that kind of environment without suppressing some of their identity. It requires others to recognise, understand, and apply attitudes and practices that are sensitive to and appropriate for people with diverse backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives, and the willingness to learn and change their own bias and attitudes.

Deaf People of Australia

Deaf People of Australia

When we discuss Deaf individuals, we are referring to those who identify as culturally Deaf, and are either Deaf or hard of hearing, using Auslan every day for communication and information gathering. This category includes Deafblind individuals and others who rely on Auslan as their preferred language. Deafness exists on a spectrum, and each deaf person may have a different degree of hearing loss compared to the next, yet they consider themselves part of the Deaf community where Auslan is the primary language, shared lived experiences are common, and there is a sense of identity and belonging.

Disability

Disability

A broad concept with several interpretations. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006) states: “Persons with disabilities include those who have long-term physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments which, in interaction with various barriers, may hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others.”

In many cases, the society would impose those barriers, either unknowing or not, which prevent a person with disability to function like an able-bodied every day anywhere. For a Deaf person, they are disabled by the society through lack of accessing to information that is not presented in Auslan or unable to communicate with others who does not know how to communicate effectively.

Diversity

Diversity

Diversity includes all aspect of a person’s life, background, preferences, and abilities with acceptance, understanding and respect in the society as equals. For a deaf person, this means their intersectionality is not being compromised and is being acknowledged for their unique perspectives and experiences which would enrich themselves and others.

Equity

Equity

The method on modifies or adding uniquely to the situation to improve the desired outcomes when one is being impacted from having full access and inclusion. For a deaf person, this means being provided with supports and adjustments that fit this particular individual, and that it is provided without questioning and assumptions by others.

Inclusion

Inclusion

The active, intentional, and ongoing engagement in ways that increase one’s participation in the activity at any time without issues and barriers. For a deaf person, this means they have full participation in an activity with suitable supports present and able to relate to everyone in the space without limits.

Inclusive Language

Inclusive Language

The effective language that is respectful, accurate and relevant to all, taking in the social diversity and meaningful to a wide audience to allow full reflection and inclusion of people in the society. It is essential to check with each person to know their preferred terms and use them consistently. For a deaf person, it is imperative that they are asked first on the preferred terms and language use they feel comfortable with before carrying on. Such terms are considered positive: Deaf, deaf, hard of hearing, Deafblind, or Auslan user, etc.

Intersectionality

Intersectionality

This term refers to the acknowledgement that individuals who belong to more than one marginalised group is more likely to experience different levels of discrimination, which could impact on how one could function in the society and being exposed to negative or limited access to things in life.

Medical Model

Medical Model

The way the society view a person with disability as an individual problem that requires medical interventions and possible cures, regardless the individual’s preferences.

Reasonable Adjustment

Reasonable Adjustment

This means deaf people were provided with changes or accommodations to various settings to ensure they can participate fully and access the same opportunities as everyone else. These adjustments can include things like providing sign language interpreters, captioning services, or written communication to help deaf individuals communicate effectively and access information. The goal is to level the playing field and remove barriers so that deaf people can contribute and succeed just like anyone else.

Universal Design

Universal Design

This means making things like products, places, and systems so that they can be used by everyone, including deaf people, without needing special changes or designs. For example, having visual alarms in addition to sound alarms in buildings helps deaf people know when there’s an emergency. Another example is using written signs alongside spoken announcements in public transportation to ensure deaf passengers can understand important information without relying on hearing. The goal is to create spaces that are inclusive and can meet the different needs and preferences of all people right from the start.

Resources

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